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Election Livonia City Council; November 5
Topic Started: May 27 2013, 08:16 PM (5,295 Views)
Mrs.M
Veteran
11file for 4 seats on City Council
May 16, 2013 |

Written by
David Veselenak
Staff Writer

Livonia
http://www.hometownlife.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013305160623
The city of Livonia could have a primary election in August to pare down the candidates for City Council later this year.

As of the deadline Tuesday, 11 residents filed to run for four seats on the City Council, which would trigger a primary election Aug. 6 if none of them drop out.

The candidates are current Trustees Maureen Miller Brosnan and Tom Robinson, along with nine others: Brian Duggan, Richard George, Steve King, Christopher Martin, Luke McGrail, Brian Meakin, Susan M. Nash, Daniel Pawlak and Lynda L. Scheel.

Current council members Joe Laura and James McCann are term-limited and cannot run again, while Robinson and Brosnan are running to retain their seats on the council. Their terms expire Dec. 31.

Friday is the withdrawal deadline

Candidates have until 4 p.m. Friday to drop out of the race.

City Clerk Terry Marecki said 11 candidates is an average number for recent City Council elections. Only eight candidates filed in 2009 for the council, eliminating the need for a primary.

The primary, she said, will most likely cost between $30,000 and $35,000 to run. She expects voter turnout to be slightly higher than the 18 percent that turned out for the $195 million school bond proposal earlier this month.

The top eight vote-getters in the August primary will move on to the general election, which will be held Nov. 5.

Known names

Several candidates have run for or served in public office before. Meakin is a former council member who was term-limited in 2011. He and Brosnan both filed to run for mayor in 2011, then withdrew.

Duggan is a former council member who ran unsuccessfully for treasurer in 2007.

King is a former Livonia school board trustee who ran unsuccessfully for the council in 2011. Scheel is a former Livonia school board trustee who was defeated in her bid for re-election in 2011. She also ran unsuccessfully for the council in 2009.

Nash and McGrail both ran unsuccessfully for the council in 2011.

George is a Livonia business owner.

Pawlak, the first to file, is a Livonia precinct delegate.

The top vote-getter in the November election will become the new council president for the next two years, and the second-place vote-getter will become the new council vice president.

The third-place vote-getter will receive a four-year term on council, while the fourth-place vote-getter will receive a two-year term.

Marecki said every candidate filed well before the 4 p.m. deadline Tuesday, with no one filing past the lunch hour.

“I was surprised, frankly,” she said. “We had everybody file by about 12:30 p.m.”

Those elected in November will join current council members Laura Toy, John Pastor and Brandon Kritzman.

[email protected]


Three drop out of Council race; no primary in August
May 19, 2013 |
David Veselenak
Staff Writer Livonia

http://www.hometownlife.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013305190462

There will be no primary for the city council race later this summer after three candidates dropped out of the race Friday.

Daniel Pawlak, Richard George and Steve King all withdrew by the deadline Friday, City Clerk Terry Marecki said. That leaves eight candidates running for the four open seats, and eliminates the need for a primary, something Marecki was happy to see from a budget standpoint.

Had the primary occurred, it would have cost the city close to $35,000.

“This is going to help budget-wise, that's for sure,” she said. “This is good for the city.”

The city used more money for elections last year with the additional election taking place because of the resignation of former U.S. Rep. Thaddeus McCotter.

Among those running are current council members Maureen Miller Brosnan and Tom Robinson, along with six challengers: Brian Duggan, Christopher Martin, Luke McGrail, Brian Meakin, Susan M. Nash, and Lynda L. Scheel.

Pawlak, a precinct delegate who was the first to file, said he considered dropping out of the race during the week.

“After much deliberation I have decided to consider withdrawing as a candidate in this race,” he said.

King was a former Livonia school board trustee who ran unsuccessfully for the council in 2011, and George is a Livonia business owner.

The general election will take place Nov. 5. The top four vote-getters in that race will join Laura Toy, Brandon Kritzman and John Pastor on the city council in 2014.

Current council members Joe Laura and James McCann are term-limited and cannot run again. Their terms expire Dec. 31.

The top vote-getter in the November election will become the new council president for the next two years, and the second-place vote-getter will become the new council vice president.

The third-place vote-getter will receive a four-year term on council, while the fourth-place vote-getter will receive a two-year term.



With no primary, eight City Council candidates gear up for long campaign
May 26, 2013
http://www.hometownlife.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013305260377

Written by
David Veselenak
Staff Writer

A sudden decrease in candidates means the eight currently running for Livonia City Council have a longer time to campaign.

The eight candidates running for four seats will not face a primary in August after three candidates dropped out of the running earlier this month.

They now have until the Nov. 5 general election to persuade residents to vote for them.

Several of them say they would like to continue seeing the city succeed in several areas, including keeping public safety a priority.

The candidates are current council members Maureen Miller Brosnan and Tom Robinson, along with six challengers: Brian Duggan, Christopher Martin, Luke McGrail, Brian Meakin, Susan M. Nash and Lynda L. Scheel.

“I am a public servant and will be honored to continue to serve my neighbors by maintaining a strong public safety force,” among other issues, said Brosnan.

Police retention

Brosnan and other members of the council, including Robinson, are wrestling over plans to attempt to retain senior police officers. It appeared the current proposed plan, which would pay a $2,100-a-month bonus to officers who stay past their retirement eligibility, will not be approved because of lack of support.

Meakin, a former councilman, said he plans on working to improve the public safety in Livonia, which will require more than just new hires.

“That's a top priority of everyone. We can add 200 police officers, but does that make us more safe? I don't think so,” he said. “We need the experience.”

Robinson said public safety, along with other services the city offers, is something he plans on continuing to fight for while working to remain fiscally responsible.

“You don't live in Livonia without realizing the benefit of our open spaces, the quality of our recreation services and the dedication of our police and firefighters,” he said. “It is my belief that with our hometown offering as much as Livonia does we need to continue finding leaders willing to protect the things we value as a community while keeping an eye on the budget.”

Nash, who ran unsuccessfully for city council in 2011, said she wants to help guide the city post-recession and continue with its economic growth.

“The economy is still improving and I want to help guide Livonia into the future,” she said. “If elected onto city council, I will put citizens first, control spending while maintaining our low tax rate and keeping our city services at exemplary levels. I want to see Livonia continue to be the city we all take great pride in living in.”

Top four win

The top four vote-getters will receive seats on city council. Current council members Joe Laura and James McCann are term-limited and cannot run again. Their terms expire Dec. 31.

The top vote-getter will become the council president, the second-place finisher will become vice president and the third-place finisher will receive a four-year term as a councilmember. The fourth-place finisher will receive a two-year term.

Martin said he plans on running a very local, grass-roots campaign, and said he wanted to represent the every-day person in the city.

“I am in the race to represent the common individual and small business owner within the city,” he said. “My campaign basically is that I don't accept monetary donations because you're not going to be able to buy my influence on votes.”

Lynda Scheel, a former Livonia school board member, said her interest in running for council stems from her desire to keep the city a great place to raise children, as well as making it an affordable place to live for those without children at home.

“I understand the importance of providing a foundation for our youngest citizens. In addition, as an empty nester, I understand the importance of keeping the benefits of a well-run city with some of the lowest tax rates in the area,” she said. “I sincerely believe my passion for the city and my public leadership experience will provide the City Council a fresh perspective and a positive point of view.”

Duggan, another former councilman, said his work on the council and other boards and community organizations make him a proper councilman.

He said his work on council before he left gives him a positive perspective on issues facing the city today.

“I believe I am the right candidate for these uncertain times,” he said. “While I was on the city council I made many resolutions including starting the paramedics program and increasing more police presence in the neighborhoods without any additional cost.”

[email protected] (313) 222-5379 Twitter: @DavidVeselenak
I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be WRONG.
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Newburgh
Member
[ *  * ]
As Paul Harvey used to say "And now, the rest of the story. This is an article that will never be published in the Livonia Observer.



http://www.freep.com/article/20130528/NEWS/305280013/Livonia-candidates-drop-out
Edited by Newburgh, May 28 2013, 08:10 PM.
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Mrs.M
Veteran
3 Livonia council candidates drop out

May 28, 2013
7 Comments

By Melanie Scott Dorsey

Detroit Free Press Staff Writer

Filed Under
Local News
Livonia

City officials in Livonia — hoping to avert a costly August primary election — asked City Council candidates to evaluate how serious they were in their bid for four seats, eventually leading three candidates to withdraw.

As it became clear that 11 people filed petitions to run for three 4-year terms and one 2-year term on the council this year, Mayor Jack Kirksey and Council members John Pastor and James McCann called candidates to inform them of the estimated $35,000 to $50,000 price tag connected with the primary.

Candidates were told that narrowing the field would eliminate the need for a primary and save the city money. In some cases, officials mentioned helping candidates new to the process or those who lost previous elections in building their experience and possibly getting seats on city commissions, the candidates said.

Three candidates — Richard George, Steve King and Daniel Pawlak — decided against running and withdrew by the May 17 deadline. All of the men said they were serious when they filed their petition and paid $50 to run, but also sympathized with the city’s need, prompting them to back out.

“I was more serious than a heart attack because I have lived in the city since 1969 and thought it was time to jump in to help the businessman,” George said. “I stepped down, not by urging, but because I felt it was right to do.”

According to the Michigan Department of State, the situation may raise ethical concerns among some, but isn’t specifically addressed in state election law.

Pastor said the calls did not urge or force anyone to withdraw, but were merely a way to let potential candidates know an election would cause further hardship to the city’s finances.

“There was nothing else on the primary ballot, not the mayor’s race, nothing but the council race and these are tough times,” Pastor said. “I made the calls to see if we could save the city money because it is part of my job to save the city money where I can.”

Pastor, who is not running for election this year and is term-limited, said in his experience there are always a lot of people running for council who may not be a serious in their bids as other candidates.

“It takes time and money and being on the council is a serious job,” Pastor said. “Some people, believe it or not, are not serious about the job but of the notoriety.”

Candidate Luke McGrail, who received a call from Pastor, described the situation as unsavory.

“I understand the city is trying to save money but this isn’t the best place to do it,” McGrail said. “The conversation was incredibly distasteful and made me wonder if we are going to let money dictate our democratic process?”

Kirksey said a primary would have been a financial hardship for the city after it was forced to participate in a special election last year to vote for a replacement for former U.S. Rep. Thaddeus McCotter and host one earlier this month for a Livonia Public Schools bond issue election.

“We would have been hard-pressed to put the money together,” Kirksey said of the primary. He added that the city paid about $60,000 for the 11th Congressional District election and between $30,000 and $40,000 for the school election on May 7.

Kirksey said those who withdrew from the race did so on their own. Officials did offer to help candidates who withdrew an opportunity to strengthen their credentials, Kirksey said.

“If some people wait two years for the next election they stand a better chance and no one was disadvantaged because it was an individual decision,” Kirksey said. “This was a good thing for the city.”

Wayne State University Law School Dean Jocelyn Benson said it is up to city officials to find other ways to save money.

“The solution to a problem like this is not to try to cancel an election,” Benson said. “The solution is to find ways to host an election that does not cost as much.”

Offering candidates help in building their service or a seat on a committee could be considered by some as a bribe, Benson said.

“Offering anything of value could amount to a bribe,” Benson said. “At the very least the behavior is unethical because voters deserve to make the decision.”
http://www.freep.com/article/20130528/NEWS/305280013/Livonia-candidates-drop-out
Contact Melanie Scott Dorsey: 313-222-6159 or [email protected]

Comments

James Foster · Top Commenter · Retired Senior Chief Petty Officer. Now at Child Protective Services

I always thought that an offer of any kind for you to act in a certain way, was indeed a bribe.

· Yesterday at 4:35am

Ronald Diebel · Top Commenter

Benson is right on target. This is an insult to the veterans who died fighting fro democracy,

· Yesterday at 3:20am

Alvin Eisenstein · Top Commenter · Budget analyst and consultant at Self Employed (Business)

Benson is wrong.. Voting procedures are set up by the state. Local governments have no way to change or lessen the expenses on conducting an election. They are what they are.

· Yesterday at 5:00am

Don Spencer · Top Commenter

It is time to scrutinize these costs and how they are calculated. Why are the costs so high? We can't afford elections in a democracy?

· Yesterday at 3:20am

Alvin Eisenstein · Top Commenter · Budget analyst and consultant at Self Employed (Business)

Election procedures are set by the State. State law says a precinct for every 1500 people. Then multiple machine at every precinct. Renting all those buildings, and running/maintaining all those machines cost money. The workers are paid about $10 bucks and hour with no benefits. It is all state laws.

· Yesterday at 5:12am

Dan Meloche · Top Commenter

Kirksey and company, the new McNamara machine of the 2010's.

· Yesterday at 4:31am

Alvin Eisenstein · Top Commenter · Budget analyst and consultant at Self Employed (Business)

Many citizens that file to run for local office have the right spirit. They indeed want to help or get involved, I know I was one of them.
However many donor realize that to run for a local office will cost a lot more money and time than they thought. Just to put purchase some yard signs and then do just ONE mailing to the potential voters, would cost $6-8,000. One mailing for the primary and then one for the general $12,000 minimum.
Many "new" candidates file their petitions, get their name on the ballot, and do not spend money and properly mount a campaign. Why? They lose terribly and they cost money for primaries. They then brag later that " I ran for office once".

· Yesterday at 5:08am


Michael Masalin · Top Commenter · Livonia, Michigan

Mayor Kirksey states "a primary would have been a financial hardship for the city", yet he has $750,000 per yr to pay 30 police officers, for who knows how long, not to retire. Note: The existing pension plan is very lucrative, signed by guess who, Mayor Kirksey! It's hard to believe anything the City of Livonia says.
http://www.freep.com/comments/article/20130528/NEWS/305280013/Livonia-candidates-drop-out
Edited by Mrs.M, May 29 2013, 12:42 PM.
I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be WRONG.
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Otis B.
Veteran
Special elections are only appropriate for pet projects like the LPS bond or Northville annexation. Livonia doesn't need all of that democracy stuff when it comes to its elected officials.
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Liv Resident
Advanced Member
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Senioritis -> No-Show Joe

Per Livonia’s Council Meeting Minutes, Mr. Laura has been absent for 5 of 8 City Council Meetings from Jan 14th through the last publish minutes of May 8th. The council has combined its Regular and Study Meetings, so they only meet 25 times a year. The combined meetings averaged 2 hrs total, from Mar 11th to Apr 22nd.

Mr. Laura, in his last term, is paid $16,600 per year or $664 per meeting or $332 per hour and has missed 64% of the meetings and pocketed $3,320 for doing nothing.

You may remember Mr. Laura’s Nov 8, 2012 Observer’s Letter to the Editor where he stated “I take my responsibilities on council very seriously” in defending his missing important council votes in 2012.

64% missed meetings, so far this year, seems like Mr. Laura isn’t as serious about his council responsibilities, as he claims.

Residents should remember Mr. Laura’s name, if it ever shows up on a ballot.
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ABC
Advanced Member
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Liv Resident
May 30 2013, 06:27 AM
Senioritis -> No-Show Joe

Per Livonia’s Council Meeting Minutes, Mr. Laura has been absent for 5 of 8 City Council Meetings from Jan 14th through the last publish minutes of May 8th. The council has combined its Regular and Study Meetings, so they only meet 25 times a year. The combined meetings averaged 2 hrs total, from Mar 11th to Apr 22nd.

Mr. Laura, in his last term, is paid $16,600 per year or $664 per meeting or $332 per hour and has missed 64% of the meetings and pocketed $3,320 for doing nothing.

You may remember Mr. Laura’s Nov 8, 2012 Observer’s Letter to the Editor where he stated “I take my responsibilities on council very seriously” in defending his missing important council votes in 2012.

64% missed meetings, so far this year, seems like Mr. Laura isn’t as serious about his council responsibilities, as he claims.

Residents should remember Mr. Laura’s name, if it ever shows up on a ballot.
It is my understanding that Mr. Laura's term is up at the end of the year. He previously sat on the Livonia BOE prior to city council, where his wife, Diane Laura, now holds a seat. Where can he go now? Interesting that city councilman Robertson's wife (Julie Robertson) took a seat on the BOE at the start of the year. I wonder how much nepotism there is in the schools and city.
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srj900
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Where can he go now? How about Mayor? You think Uncle Jack will run again? Hell, he is picking out his headstone now.
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MsPatriot
Advanced Member
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I believe Joe Laura ran for mayor a while ago. He was campaigning door to door in my subdivision. He could also run for state rep as did John Pastor. Once they have name recognition through a stint on a school board or city council, they have a good chance of winning another seat somewhere else. It doesn't matter if they are capable or not, people vote a familiar name if they don't know who to vote for. Watch Scheel get elected to the city council. She is one that I would rather not see in any position of authority in Livonia.
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Mrs.M
Veteran
Livonia mayor defends calling candidates before deadline

Written by
David Veselenak
Staff Writer

May 30, 2013
http://www.hometownlife.com/article/20130530/NEWS10/305300489/Livonia-mayor-defends-calling-candidates-before-deadline

Phone calls from Livonia city officials to city council candidates may have played a role in the number of candidates dropping to eight, eliminating the need for a primary this summer.

Several city council candidates received phone calls from Livonia city officials before the drop-out date earlier this month, asking them if their time and effort would be more useful serving the city in other capacities. It's a practice that has taken place before, said Mayor Jack Kirksey, especially with the costs involved of running a primary.

“Conversations took place among people interested. It was not an organized group,” he said. “In some elections, there's little or no activity, because it looks like a group that is equipped to move forward. It varies differently with each election.”

Kirksey said he sees nothing wrong with calling and determining where candidates stand on an election, especially when it comes to saving the city money. He said no promises of appointments or recommendations to city boards or commissions were made.

Three of the 11 candidates — Daniel Pawlak, Steve King and Richard George — dropped out of the city council race before the May 17 deadline, eliminating the need for an August primary that would have cost the city roughly $35,000.

Before the drop date, some city officials, including Kirksey and councilman Jim McCann, contacted some new candidates and inquired about their candidacy and if they were serious about running.

“We try and see if people are really serious and see what people are trying to accomplish,” McCann said. “It's not uncommon.”

Kirksey said the city spent $41,500 on a special election to fill former U.S. Rep. Thaddeus McCotter's seat after he resigned last August.

McCann, who is term-limited and is leaving the council at the end of the year, said sometimes people file to run for city council to get involved, when experience elsewhere may benefit them. He said he would point some people to other organizations in Livonia, such as the city's chamber of commerce, the Fallen Heroes Monument at Larry Nehasil Memorial Park committee or Greenmead Historical Village.

That experience for people without it is crucial if they plan on running for council, he said.

“You don't realize the monumental task in the day-to-day activity,” McCann said. “If you've got no background or experience, you're not prepared.”

Fred Woodhams, a spokesman with the Michigan Secretary of State, said the phone calls to candidates to gauge their candidacy is not illegal and can be done.

“It's just not something that is addressed in state election law,” he said.

Kirksey said speaking to newer candidates is no different than other meetings he has with residents looking to get more involved in the city's affairs.

“I probably have two or three citizen-to-mayor meetings of people who want to fill one of these 160 vacancies we have (regularly),” he said. “Those kinds of meetings go on day in and day out.”

Pawlak said he received no pressure from any city official to drop out, and did so voluntarily after speaking with several city officials, including Kirksey.

After talking with several officials, Pawlak said he felt his talents could be used elsewhere instead of running for city council.

“He absolutely did not pressure me into making any decisions,” Pawlak said of Kirksey. “He encouraged me to remain involved. I'm very thankful for what he's done with me.”

He did not rule out a future run for the city council in an upcoming year.

Kirksey said calling and determining where candidates stand on an election is something that's been done previously, and he sees nothing wrong with finding out where they stand, especially when it comes to saving the city money.

“Would (it) be inappropriate to find out if one of the candidates shares that same view?” he said. “What harm has been done?”


The eight remaining candidates will face off in the general election, scheduled for Nov. 5.

[email protected] (313) 222-5379 Twitter: @DavidVeselenak
I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be WRONG.
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ABC
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MsPatriot
May 30 2013, 05:22 PM
I believe Joe Laura ran for mayor a while ago. He was campaigning door to door in my subdivision. He could also run for state rep as did John Pastor. Once they have name recognition through a stint on a school board or city council, they have a good chance of winning another seat somewhere else. It doesn't matter if they are capable or not, people vote a familiar name if they don't know who to vote for. Watch Scheel get elected to the city council. She is one that I would rather not see in any position of authority in Livonia.
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ABC
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srj900
May 30 2013, 04:31 PM
Where can he go now? How about Mayor? You think Uncle Jack will run again? Hell, he is picking out his headstone now.
Good Lord, hope not!
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ABC
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MsPatriot
May 30 2013, 05:22 PM
I believe Joe Laura ran for mayor a while ago. He was campaigning door to door in my subdivision. He could also run for state rep as did John Pastor. Once they have name recognition through a stint on a school board or city council, they have a good chance of winning another seat somewhere else. It doesn't matter if they are capable or not, people vote a familiar name if they don't know who to vote for. Watch Scheel get elected to the city council. She is one that I would rather not see in any position of authority in Livonia.
Sure hope people do their homework for this election.
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Purple Haze
Veteran
sure hope they VOTE in this election!
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Mrs.M
Veteran
Livonia's ethics committee to examine phone calls to candidates who dropped out

Jun. 4, 2013 9:04 AM

Written by

David Veselenak

Staff Writer

Livonia’s ethics committee will examine three elected officials’ conduct after they made phone calls to city council candidates before the drop-out deadline.

City councilwoman Maureen Miller Brosnan offered the resolution to investigate the conduct of Mayor Jack Kirksey, Council Vice President John Pastor and Councilman James McCann, all who say they made phone calls asking candidates about their position on running for city council.

“We are going to have to ask this evening, regrettably, for a very specific resolution, asking for the advisory opinion of the ethics board of alleged unethical conduct of three elected officials who had a role in discouraging council candidates from running,” she said. “This is a sad moment to have to ask for this.”

The resolution was approved with six “yes” votes, with Pastor voting present.

Another motion, made by Councilman Joe Laura, requested the issue be sent to the state election commission to review the conduct. The request was made after Laura found out about an appointment of one of the dropped-out candidates to the city’s art commission made days after the drop-out deadline.

He said the appointment appeared suspicious, coming so soon after the candidate had received a phone call regarding his campaign and ultimately dropped out.

“A number of rumors are swirling around, and I’m holding in my hand the appointment of one individual that dropped to the Livonia Arts Commission. The date of that letter is May 29, and that’s a paid position within the city,” he said. “It’s very unusual to have three individuals drop from a race, especially when that’s the exact number that would require removing the need for a primary. I think as a city, we owe it to ourselves to clarify this.”

Laura said he has heard there is a possibility of another former candidate also being offered a position on a city board as well.

The three have defended the move and said no laws were violated in calling the candidates. Several said the calls were made to see if the candidates were truly serious about running and if not, could save the city more than $35,000 if they dropped out to avoid an August primary.

Former candidates Daniel Pawlak, Steve King and Richard George all dropped out of the running before the drop-out date last month, leaving eight candidates and eliminating the need for a primary election in August. Several city officials supported the move, saying it would help save the money the city would be required to pay for the election, especially after having to hold a special election last year to fill the U.S. House seat vacated by Thaddeus McCotter last summer.

Pastor said he made one phone call and offered nothing of personal gain to the candidate.

“The person I talked to, his only comment was, ‘What’s in it for me if I get out?’” he said. “And I responded to him, saying ‘You’d save your city approximately $35,000-$50,000. That’s what’s in it for you.’

“We have not hurt the democratic process at all. We asked a question. That’s our job.”

Pastor and McCann are term-limited and cannot run again. Their terms expire Dec. 31.

Council President Laura Toy said going to the state election commission before the city has the chance to examine the issue was premature and recommended against it.

“If you throw it at the elections commission... these are allegations and so you have to take one step at a time,” she said.

The motion failed 4-3, with Brosnan, Laura and Councilman Tom Robinson being the only supporters.

Kirksey said the arts commission appointment was made after speaking with the candidate who showed an interest in helping the city. Kirksey said he simply showed the candidate a list of boards and committees, and he independently made the decision to elect for appointment to the arts commission.

“I think we’re going about it the wrong way, and I think we’re doing a huge disservice to the young man who wants to do this,” he said. “I think that’s a horrible, horrible thing to do.”

Laura said he wants to have the discussion out in the open and work to put the issue behind the city. He said the issue is not characteristic of Livonia, and wants to have it closed as soon as possible.

“I want us to get past the manipulation,” he said. “Let’s have some people look at it, let’s have some people decide. Let’s have some people see if boundaries were stepped across and let’s have appropriate corrections made and get past this.”
The general election for city council is scheduled for Nov. 5.



I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be WRONG.
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Otis B.
Veteran
Will this be an honest inquiry or an exercise in box checking? Time will tell.
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Joe_Shmo
Newbie
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Well lets look at Uncle Jack. Didn't he have his hand in the ring trying to annex part of Northville with some shady deal with the developer! I love the comment we didn't do anything illegal. Not everything in life is covered by a written law. Were their actions ethical. Where was Jack when LPS held their special election. I guess it was ok to spend the 50k when it's something the Livonia supreme commanders want. I used to be proud to be from Livonia. Seems that we are now just West Detroit.
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want2know..
Advanced Member
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If they didn’t call all 11 of the candidates to complain about primary election costs & ask if they were serious about running, then IMO it does seem unfair to single a few out, knowing that call could possibly discourage someone from running for city council.

The Mayor acknowledges in the article that we were just forced to pay for 2 other special elections: Did the Mayor Et al. call McCotter and let him know if he didn’t finish his term it was going to cost Livonia a lot of $$? Did they call the LPS Superintendent & ask him to please postpone a $35,000 May election until November to save us money? If not, why not – what’s the difference?

BTW, thanks Newburg & Mrs. M for posting the Free Press article/comments, which had quite a different take on this story than the Observer. I have a feeling if the Freep & Detroit News weren’t uncovering these inside stories we’d never hear of them.
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Mrs.M
Veteran
want2know..
Jun 5 2013, 10:51 AM
Did they call the LPS Superintendent & ask him to please postpone a $35,000 May election until November to save us money? If not, why not – what’s the difference?

Actually it wasn't the city that footed the bill for the school bond, it was the school system. The school paid the city and the poll workers. There was no cost to the city for the May election, that would be why Kirksey et al wouldn't be concerned with the cost, it didn't come out of Livonia's budget.
I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be WRONG.
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ABC
Advanced Member
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Mrs.M
Jun 5 2013, 12:43 PM
want2know..
Jun 5 2013, 10:51 AM
Did they call the LPS Superintendent & ask him to please postpone a $35,000 May election until November to save us money? If not, why not – what’s the difference?

Actually it wasn't the city that footed the bill for the school bond, it was the school system. The school paid the city and the poll workers. There was no cost to the city for the May election, that would be why Kirksey et al wouldn't be concerned with the cost, it didn't come out of Livonia's budget.
Correction: the superintendent and BOE selflessly decided that the taxpayers will foot the costs of the special election and the payment will come out of the bond money. The cost is still unknown for the years of work by LPS staff, research companies, consultants, pretty brochures, videos, demos, support staff, etc. OR where the monies are coming/came from to get this to pass in such a shady manner.

My other comment: Joe Laura is not fooling anyone by saying that the issue is not characteristic of Livonia. See above. It seems more likely that he is mad that this seat on the Art Commission is being filled by someone other than himself. As these people are monopolizing the BOE, City Council and other commissions. Jumping from one to the other. Now the wives take over their seats once their time is up. Really...Livonia?
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Newburgh
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Richard McDowell, Jacob S. Ghannam, Audrey Greenleaf, Lora Weingarden and James McCann are members of the Ethics Board. As you know, McCann is one of the city officials that pressured the three candidates to drop out of the election. All members are appointed by the Mayor (also involved in this investigation) and confirmed by the City Council (of which two members are involved in this investigation). It gets better...the Ethics Board is an advisory body that issues nonbinding decisions. Any bets on the outcome of this "investigation"?

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